Process analysis and mass balance of whey nanofiltration (2016-17)

Project outcomes

Sponsored by Bega Cheese

This project is proudly funded and supported by The Gardiner Foundation


Project title: 
Process analysis and mass balance of whey nanofiltration
Description of the project: 

Whey is the main by-product obtained from cheese production. Released during the precipitation of casein from milk by acid or enzymatic coagulation represents 85 to 95% of milk used in cheese production and contains 55% of solids components present in milk. It is estimated that about 10L of milk is used to make 1kg of cheese, resulting in 8-9L of whey. Whey is rich in valuable components, such as protein and lactose and fat molecules. Whey contains a high concentration of valuable organic matter, but demineralization is needed before it can be used. At Coburg Plant, Bega Cheese uses nanofiltration to demineralise the salty whey to get concentrated whey (retentate) and permeate. 

The aim of this project is to complete a nanofiltration process analysis, provide a total and compositional mass balance and identify areas of process improvement and potential increased efficiency. 

Project brief

Project brief

Sponsored by Bega Cheese

This project is proudly funded and supported by The Gardiner Foundation

Location: 
Coburg, VIC
Description of the project: 

Whey is the main by-product obtained from cheese production. Released during the precipitation of casein from milk by acid or enzymatic coagulation represents 85 to 95% of milk used in cheese production and contains 55% of solids components present in milk. It is estimated that about 10L of milk is used to make 1kg of cheese, resulting in 8-9L of whey. Whey is rich in valuable components, such as protein and lactose and fat molecules. Whey contains a high concentration of valuable organic matter, but demineralization is needed before it can be used. At Coburg Plant, Bega Cheese uses nanofiltration to demineralise the salty whey to get concentrated whey (retentate) and permeate. 

The aim of this project is to complete a nanofiltration process analysis, provide a total and compositional mass balance and identify areas of process improvement and potential increased efficiency. 

Project outcomes

This project has been closed
Faculty or Department: 
Engineering-Chemical
Engineering-Software
Information Technology
Science
Disciplines: 
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer Science
Software Development & Software Engineering
Sector: 
Dairy
Manufacturing
Employment Type: 
Scholarship

Applications for this project are welcome from penultimate and subsequent year undergraduates, Masters and PhD students (coursework and research) who are enrolled full-time at Monash.

Selection Criteria: 

Your application will be reviewed by senior faculty members and assessed against the following criteria:

  • Quality of covering letter, resume and on-line application form including spelling & grammar
  • Relevance of your degree to the project(s) you select
  • Skills, ability, knowledge and experience relevant to the project (s) you apply for
  • Extra - curricular activities (i.e. sports/clubs & societies/memberships)
  • Career goals & ambitions
  • Academic performance
  • Successful completion of group activity
  • Successful interview with industry partner

 Please note:

  • Scope for MITI projects are determined by the industry partners, this includes student disciplines and whether they require students at undergraduate, Masters or PhD level.
  • The final selection of the MITI project team will be made by the industry partner.
  • Each industry project will run for 12 weeks over the summer vacation period that is December 2016 through to February 2017.
  • If selected you must be available and agree to commit for the entire 12 week period. 
Duration: 
12 weeks
Max number of recipients: 
4
Application process: 

Applications are submitted online via the MITI website and must include a cover letter (no more than one page) and current CV.

 Your cover letter should include the following information:

  • why the project is of particular interest to you
  • an outline of relevant experience either through vacation work, study or other extra curricula activities
  • what you can contribute as a member of the team

Bega Cheese

The Bega factory began production in 1900. As demand grew for the rich, creamy products made in the traditional way, successive expansion took place, the installation of an Alfomatic cheddaring machine, including in-line milk standardisation and upgraded milk separator capacity. This technology allows Bega Cheese to produce up to 20,000 tonnes of consistently high quality natural Bega cheddar cheese each year.

The natural cheese cutting and packing plant includes a high speed block cutting and packaging system which is the latest and fastest technology available in the world and also contains equipment for the grating of cheese, flow wrapping and vacuum packaging of cheese from 10g to 10Kg blocks, portion and string cheese packs. The Bega Cheese plant can produce packages of various sizes and shapes in line with consumer demands for both export and domestic markets.